top of page

Meet Angie Wong

Each of us has unique life experiences and talents. Yet, many of us look for external validation instead of celebrating our strengths. The core of our work is to recognize and embrace who we are.

​Meet Angie, who is a Professional Certified Coach with the International Coaching Federation (ICF) with 2000+ coaching hours serving MNC C-Suites, directors, and top talents in the US, Europe & Asia.


As the former president of First Interstate Bank in the US, she had extensive experience in building organizational capability and managing broad-scale change efforts. She was named “Outstanding Female Banking Executive” by Independent Bankers Magazine in 2006.


We asked Angie a few questions to learn more about her approach to life & coaching.


Q: How did you decide that you wanted to become a coach?


A: Throughout my corporate career, I had incredible coaches who shaped me as a woman leader, to lead courageously, and to build authentic connections so I can drive results through people. This inspired me to become a coach to pay it forward by supporting other leaders.


Q: What do you know now that you wish you would have known when you were younger?


A: Each of us has unique life experiences and talents. Yet, many of us look for external validation instead of celebrating our strengths. The core of our work is to recognize and embrace who we are.


Make time for self-care, and prioritize me-time for self-reflection and connection. Be aware of the mental scripts that may be holding us back. These mental scripts can be shaped by our upbringing, caretakers, and cultural environment. We need to take time to calm the noises of our minds so we can be aware of the scripts running in the background.


With my mindfulness practices, I am now a better observer of my body sensations, and how thoughts and emotions affect my body and behaviors. I learned to calm my mind, observe and reflect on what patterns got in my way. I started to bring my whole self (my mind, my heart, my body, and my intuitive knowing) into my work, at home, and in other aspects of my life. Link to my article “Letter to Younger Self”: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/you-could-go-back-time-how-would-advise-your-younger-self-angie-wong/


Q: What are some of the most common biases of Asian female employees at the workplace and how do you coach people to deal with these?


A: The process of becoming a leader – and seeing oneself as a leader – is more difficult for women, primarily due to gender bias, which is not always easy to recognize.


For example, behavior that’s considered assertive for a man is considered aggressive for a woman, and while men are supported in their assertiveness, women are discouraged. Women in leadership are told to be more assertive and outspoken. However, they are rarely praised for speaking up and advocating for their ideas. This is a double bind, that causes women to continually question their worth and effectiveness and limits their growth as leaders.


Drawing on the courageous leadership work of Dr. Brene Brown, I support women leaders to gain practical skillsets to open to vulnerability, lean into tough conversations, and build trusted connections to maximize business performance. I also work with women leaders to be anchored in purpose, so they are more likely to be proactive in adopting the leadership traits that will take them to the next level.


Link to my article “Gender bias creates a double bind for women”: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/gender-bias-creates-double-bind-women-angie-wong/

Q: What's your morning routine to start a productive day?


A: As an ardent mindfulness practitioner, I practice mindful breathing and walking every morning so I can bring my full self and energy to support my clients and people around me.


Connect with Angie Wong via LinkedIn.







12 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

Comments


bottom of page