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Meet Julie M. Wong, PhD.

Updated: Jul 6, 2022

I thought about what I love to do so much that I would do it for free - and it was to empower leaders to live their dream of a better world.

Meet Julie M. Wong, PhD, a coach that she wishes she had as one of the highest-ranking women of color in several organizations. She is living her dream of igniting world leaders to live their dream of a better world. A natural leader - riding shotgun in the photo below.


We asked Julie a few questions to learn more about her approach to life & coaching.


Q: What were some childhood moments that shaped you into who you are today?


A: My aunt was one of the most influential persons in my life. She would take me to see Asian American Plays where I learned about my Asian heritage and the challenges that our community has faced. She was a board member of Chinese For Affirmative Action in San Francisco. CAA fought for immigrant rights and justice for Asian Americans. My aunt once told me that once you cross the bridge, you don’t bring the drawbridge up, you leave it down and help others cross the bridge.


That concept stayed with me throughout my career in Higher Education. I had a passion for empowering Asian Americans and helping them move up in their career. One of my greatest joys was being a role model and mentor to the Asian American Community and for people of color.


Q: How did you decide that you wanted to become a coach?


A: I was let go from my job and was blessed to retire from over 30 years as a senior administrator in higher education. I thought about what I love to do so much that I would do it for free - and it was to empower leaders to live their dream of a better world. I was passionate about mentoring leaders of color because I was in their shoes. I climbed the ladder and want to use my experience and knowledge for good.


Q: What are some of the most common biases of Asian female employees at the workplace and how do you coach people to deal with these?


A: When I was young in my career I was told I had quiet leadership and that I needed to speak up more. I tried to fit into a style of leadership that was not my own. Fear of failure held me back a lot. Sometimes Asian women are put into a box and when we embrace our power - people are uncomfortable with us not being in their nice little box. I was also told that I was too serious so I had to learn how to manage people's impressions of me.


Q: What do you know now that you wish you would have known when you were younger?


A: Life is short. Listen to your heart and your gut. I spent too much time worrying and planning for the future. I wish I was more present and able to enjoy being in the moment.


Q: What is an object and/or phrase that symbolizes 2022 for you?


A: Live for today, for tomorrow has enough worries of its own.


Q: What motivates you to keep going when the going gets tough?


A: I have a gratitude journal where I write at least 3 things I am grateful for each day. In addition, I write down three declarations each day.


Q: What motivates you to keep going when the going gets tough?


A: I have a gratitude journal where I write at least 3 things I am grateful for each day. In addition, I write down three declarations each day.

Q: What are the top books/podcasts that inspired you in the past 12 months?


A: Positive Intelligence by Shirzad Chamine & Caste by Isabel Wilkerson


Q: What's your morning routine to start a productive day?


A: I start the day with meditation. I usually read something positive like a daily devotion or something from the bible to keep me grounded. I then spend a few minutes looking out in nature. I let nature speak to me and I breathe. I then do yoga - as this really helps to calm me down. I have a journal that I try to write 1-3 pages in, then I write 3 things I’m grateful for, and 3 "I am" declarations.


Connect with Julie Wong via LinkedIn.



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